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Acne FAQ: Here's what you need to know

HelloSkin’s MedSci team has gathered a list of frequently asked questions and answers relevant to people living with acne.  

IS ACNE HEREDITARY?

Acne can run in families, but most cases are sporadic.

DOES SEASONAL WEATHER CHANGE AFFECT ACNE?

About one-third of the patients reported an aggravation of their acne in winter, but also approximately one-third of the patients complained about an aggravation of their acne in summer. Another third did not notice any change. (1)

DOES CLEANSING PREVENT ACNE?

Acne is not cured by cleansing, however, a regular gentle daily cleansing/moisturising routine helps improve acne prone skin. Intensive washing has a risk of harming the skin barrier and instead causing dry skin, especially in sensitive skin which can further irritate skin and worsen acne. (2)  

WHEN DO I NEED TO SEE A DOCTOR?

If you have mild acne and the over-the-counter products have not worked for you, then it is probably time for you to visit your doctor. For moderate and severe acne you would need to see your GP or dermatologist respectively, for appropriate treatment. To get the most out of your consultation with the doctor, do prepare beforehand. Write down your questions. No question is too trivial to ask, if it is on your mind, do ask. Remember that your doctor wants to help you in the best way possible.

Many skin conditions take months to improve and acne is no exception. Do try to be patient and stick to your skincare routine or prescription and expect to wait at least two to four months before seeing the maximum effect of treatment.

CAN MEDICATION CAUSE ACNE?

Several drugs are known to provoke acne for example corticosteroids, anabolic steroids, testosterone, halogenated structures, isoniazid, lithium, and some new anticancer agents. There is usually a history of drug intake, sudden onset, and an unusual age of onset, unusual location of acne. (3)


REFERENCES:

1: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8850040

2: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25483138

3: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28274352



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